One hundred thirty miles from Mexico City, Querétaro is a small paradise and the right place for cold weather lovers.

With a wide variety of landscapes—scrubland in the central zone’s highlands, coniferous and oak forests to the north, and dry forests in the center lower lands—Querétaro is an ideal place to rest, disconnect from busy life, and enjoy nature. Travelers can also find in it a flavorful tour of cheese and wine.

An Art, Wine, and Cheese tour

“There are only two kinds of wine: the good wine and the best wine,” the saying goes. The wisdom behind it comes true in Querétaro’s art, wine, and cheese tour. Located 15 minutes from Tequisquiapan, this tour covers vineyards that provide visitors with the opportunity of tasting 100% Mexican wines.

Besides vineyards, Querétaro has fields of crops and pasture with a significant cattle production, and travelers can taste and discover the culture behind fresh and matured artisan cheeses of cow, goat, and sheep.

With a wide variety of landscapes—scrubland in the central zone’s highlands, coniferous and oak forests to the north, and dry forests in the center lower lands—Querétaro is an ideal place to rest, disconnect from busy life, and enjoy nature. (Photo by Gabriel Tovar/Unsplash)

The best time to visit this region is during the National Cheese and Wine Fair, which occurs each year during spring in Tequisquiapan, a town of cobblestone streets and traditional rustic houses. During the Fair, attendees get to know the cheese factories and winemakers of the region. They learn about different pairings and try white, rosé, red, and bubbly sparkling wines. The event usually lasts three weekends, from late May to mid-June, but the 2020 celebration was canceled due to COVID restrictions.

The best time to visit this region is during the National Cheese and Wine Fair, which occurs each year during spring in Tequisquiapan. (Photo by Dylan Reuter/Unsplash)

Apart from offering a unique experience of cheese and wine, Queretaro also provides visitors an opportunity to learn about the art of quarry carving, practiced by the region’s first settlers. The colonizers used this material in buildings, fountains, churches, monuments, houses, and the aqueduct. In 1996, UNESCO recognized Querétaro’s baroque architecture, based on quarry, as a world heritage site.

Querétaro’s Spanish Colonial beauty makes the trip worthwhile. In the words of Mexican writer Alberto Ruy Sánchez, Querétaro “had become a kind of laboratory of art, where each church, each convent, each mansion, each fort, each railing, was a stylistic challenge to its creators, who found themselves immersed in the logic of an aesthetic exuberance which dominated the city buildings.”

(Translated and edited by Gabriela Olmos. edited by Ganesh Lakshman and Bryan Wilkes)



The post A Mexican Art, Wine, and Cheese Tour appeared first on Zenger News.

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